Protecting the Chesapeake

Marylanders love their crabs, fish, and the Bay, but this way of life could disappear forever unless we follow through on our pollution reduction commitments. Clean Water is working to reduce agricultural pollution, address polluted runoff, and keep Maryland on track.

Power plant behind water spewing smoke. Photo credit: Martin Haas / Shutterstock

Power Plant Pollution Poisoning the Chesapeake Bay

Coal-burning power plants are poisoning the Chesapeake Bay with millions of harmful pollutants every year, including excessive nutrients that contribute to “dead zones” where crabs, oysters, fish and other aquatic life cannot survive.

 

General MD Baltimore Harbor. Credit HES Photography. Shutterstock

Local Victories From Around the State!

We’ve had a busy summer 2016 in Maryland! So much great work is being done to protect Maryland’s environment. Continue reading below to find out about some of our local victories from across the State.

Street drain, stormwater runoff. Photo credit: Abramov Timur / Shutterstock

Stormwater Pollution

Stormwater is the polluted runoff gathered from rain, severe thunderstorms, and even snow from roads, parking lots, and other impervious surfaces, where runoff collects pollutants and carries them downstream, ultimately into the Chesapeake Bay.

Support clean water in the Monocacy River!

The Monocacy River is the largest Maryland tributary to the Potomac, has a watershed of 970 square miles, and is the source of more than a quarter

From We All Live Downstream

July 13, 2017

Yesterday was the latest in many public hearings about the Monocacy Scenic River Management Plan.  Developed by a volunteer board of Frederick County and Carroll County Residents, the Plan is meant to outline the many water quality, land use, and wildlife habitat challenges facing the Monocacy River - one of the most polluted watersheds in the state - and recommend ways that Frederick County, Carroll County, the City of Frederick, the Town of Walkersville, and groups and individuals within its watershed can protect and improve it.  But unfortunately during the hearing process for the first

Lake Marian, in the Linganore Creek watershed
June 30, 2017

Every summer in Frederick County, Maryland, news hits about algae blooms, sediment, and other pollution in Lake Linganore.  Source of nearly half of the drinking water in Frederick City and the central part of the County and an important center for recreation for the Linganore community, Linganore Creek and its 83-square-mile watershed are vital for Frederick County.  But historic agricultural runoff, continue

June 1, 2017

Emily, Caitlin from the Potomac Conservancy, and I spent last weekend in downtown Frederick at the Green Neighbor Festival.  This two-day gathering for environmentalists, gardeners, advocates, and families was planned by Hood College’s Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies (CCWS) and the Friends of Baker Park to promote environmental sustainability and “green” practices to protect land, water, and energy resources.  As part of the Clean Water Frederick team, we were there to share information about watersheds and water quality in Frederick County, encourage residents to act to p