Jennifer Kunze - Maryland Program Organizer

Fighting crude oil terminals in Baltimore

February 16, 2018

On Wednesday, February 21, the Baltimore City Council's Land Use and Transportation Committee will hold a hearing on the Crude Oil Terminal Prohibition: Baltimore's best chance for preventing a deadly crude oil train explosion.  Rally with us at noon in front of City Hall!  And to learn more, read our comments on the bill below.

 

The fight for a foam-free Baltimore

February 16, 2018

This week, a bill to ban styrofoam food packages was approved by Baltimore City's Housing and Urban Affairs Committee.  Thanks to incredible organizing by the student-led group Baltimore Beyond Plastic, who brought hundreds of elementary, middle, and high school students to rally and testify in support of the bill, it received unanimous committee support.  Below are the comments we submitted on behalf of this bill.  Kudos to the kids who made it possible!

 

Speaking out on sewage

January 26, 2018

Baltimore's sewage system is in trouble.  Sanitary sewage outfalls allow untreated sewage to spill into our streams during rainstorms.  Overflowing pipes spill water into our streets, and even our basements.  And major capital improvements are needed at our wastewater treatment facilities and throughout the system for Baltimore to clean up our waterways that lead to the Inner Harbor and keep pollution out of our neighborhoods.

Transportation, air quality, BaltimoreLink, and the Red Line

January 22, 2018

Public transportation systems are a key air quality and climate change issue.  About a third of Maryland's total greenhouse gas emissions come from the transportation sector.  Public transportation uses at least half as much energy to move a single person as a private vehicle, and one study found that replacing private vehicle trips with public transit trips reduces carbon monoxide by 95%, volatile organic compounds by 90%, and carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide by 45%.  Robust public transit systems allow commuters and travele

The Muddy Monocacy?

October 19, 2017

In Frederick County, MD, there are several competing theories about the source of the name of the Monocacy River.  One is that it meant “muddy waters” in the language of the Native Americans who lived there.  That certainly makes sense when you look at it – in living memory, the Monocacy has been a muddy river, with severe sedementation problems that make the river run red and brown after a rainstorm.  But others say that Monnockkesey was the Shawnee name for the river: “river with many bends.”  That’s certainly true: the largest Maryland tributary to the Potomac, the river makes many curve

Spreading the word about crude oil trains - neighborhood by neighborhood

October 5, 2017

“Most of my district is within one mile of the tracks that crude oil has been transported on. I don’t want any more crude oil tank cars putting the neighborhoods in my district at risk.”

Baltimore's Lead Testing Survey

August 31, 2017

Clean Water Action is conducting a study of 200 homes in Baltimore City and County to test for lead contamination in drinking water.

Lead can enter water if it is present in the service lines, in-home pipes, or faucets and fixtures in your home, and if water is corrosive or has high mineral content.  To learn more about how lead enters drinking water, click here.

Clean Water Action can test your drinking water for free if:

Train Tunnels through West Baltimore

August 18, 2017

On Wednesday, the Baltimore City Council held an investigational hearing on the proposed B&P Tunnel expansion through West Baltimore.  For the past few years, the Federal Railway Administration tasked Amtrak, MDOT, and Baltimore DOT with finding a solution to the constraints of the existing B&P Tunnel underneath West Baltimore: its narrowness and disrepair slow down and sometimes disrupt Amtrak and MARC passengers traveling betwen Baltimore and DC.  But residents of the neighborhoods above the proposed new tunnel have been

Speaking out for the Monocacy

July 13, 2017

Yesterday was the latest in many public hearings about the Monocacy Scenic River Management Plan.  Developed by a volunteer board of Frederick County and Carroll County Residents, the Plan is meant to outline the many water quality, land use, and wildlife habitat challenges facing the Monocacy River - one of the most polluted watersheds in the state - and recommend ways that Frederick County, Carroll County, the City of Frederick, the Town of Walkersville, and groups and individuals within its watershed can protect and improve it.  But unfortunately during the hearing process for the first

Lake Marian, in the Linganore Creek watershed

Protecting Lake Linganore: Frederick City's drinking water

June 30, 2017

Every summer in Frederick County, Maryland, news hits about algae blooms, sediment, and other pollution in Lake Linganore.  Source of nearly half of the drinking water in Frederick City and the central part of the County and an important center for recreation for the Linganore community, Linganore Creek and its 83-square-mile watershed are vital for Frederick County.  But historic agricultural runoff, continue