Environmental Justice in Maryland

Every community in the state of Maryland deserves to have their health and environmental safety treated with equity and integrity. Clean Water believes that your health and quality of life should not be determined by your zip code. We work with overburdened communities to ensure their voices are heard.

Sewage Overflow in Baltimore. Photo by Jennifer Kunze

Baltimore City Council Hearing on Sewage Backups

Have you had sewage back up into your home in Baltimore City?

Bipartisan Coalition Demands End to Ratepayer Subsidies for Trash Incineration

On March 8th, an unlikely alliance of Republican and Democratic legislators, residents from across Maryland, and environmental advocates

Pipelines reflecting sunset. Photo credit Amy Johansson / Shutterstock

The Impacts of Pipelines

The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) issued a permit to Columbia Gas without providing the necessary information to the public, and did not comply with Clean Water Act or State Law when issuing the permit.

 

Sewage Backups in Baltimore

Heavy rainfall stresses all of our infrastructure: flooded transportation systems, leaking houses developing mold, inundated drinking water sources

From We All Live Downstream

October 3, 2019

On September 30, 2019, the Maryland Department of Environment held a meeting on the growing concerns surrounding the effectiveness of the “Baltimore City Building Backup Expedited Reimbursement Pilot Program”. Albeit the name of the program is long, the issues that this program remedies are concise. In general, the program is meant to compensate for the cost of the flooding of sewage within the basements of Baltimore City residents.

September 26, 2019

For almost a year, our team has been knocking on doors, visiting community association, and speaking at community festivals in Baltimore City about a subject nobody really wants to talk about: sewage backing up into people's basements. According to 311 call records, this happens to more than 4,500 times in Baltimore City every year, and the results can be severe: thousands of dollars in financial damages, panic and disruption to daily life, exposure to dangerous pathogens, and long-term health risks from mold and mildew in damp, bacteria-infested walls.

Baltimore City Councilman Bill Henry, residents, and advocates in front of City Hall after the Plastic Bag Reduction Bill public hearing.
August 12, 2019

On Tuesday, August 6, the Baltimore City Council's Judiciary Committee held its first public hearing on the Plastic Bag Reduction Bill. This important legislation bans plastic bags in stores in Baltimore, with exceptions for bags used for products like fresh meats, unpackaged fruits, or ice, and locations like farmers' markets and pharmacies. It also puts a 5-cent fee on paper bags - part of which will help the store meet the extra cost of buying and storing paper bags, and part of which can help the city distribute free reusable bags.