Environmental Justice in Maryland

Every community in the state of Maryland deserves to have their health and environmental safety treated with equity and integrity. Clean Water believes that your health and quality of life should not be determined by your zip code. We work with overburdened communities to ensure their voices are heard.

Environmental Groups Win Victory in Reducing Coal Plant Water Pollution in Maryland

Emily Ranson, Maryland Program Coordinator for Clean Water Action, said: "Marylanders are drinking from and fishing in waterways downstream of power plants, and these waterways should not be dumping grounds for power plants' toxic waste. Industry should be held accountable for its pollution. Marylanders should not subsidize polluting power plants by suffering the negative health impacts or paying higher water treatment costs to clean up their mess."

Coal-buring power plant, Alexandria VA. Photo credit: Douglas Litchfield / Shutterstock

REDUCE Act (SB398 / HB820)

Every Marylander has the right to breathe clean air and drink clean water. Communities and industry both benefit when community concerns are addressed early in the air pollution permit application process.

Baltimore Residents Protest Dangerous Oil Trains as City Council Weighs Action

Analysis indicates 165,000 Baltimore residents live within the potential oil train blast zone. The City Council is urged to place a moratorium on permits for crude oil shipping terminals.

From We All Live Downstream

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June 17, 2019

As environmental awareness has continued to increase, the debate of banning distribution of plastic bags has been brought to the table. Implementing policy regarding this issue in Baltimore City would lead to numerous benefits for its residents, its economy, and its surrounding ecosystems. A plastic bag ban in Baltimore City may reap a large positive economic impact by decreasing the demand for disposable bags and increasing the demand for reusable bags.

May 7, 2019

This morning, the Baltimore City Council's Judiciary and Legislative Investigations Committee held a public hearing on Resolution "for the purpose of inviting the Director of the Department of Public Works, the Head of the Bureau of Solid Waste, the Director of the Office of Sustainability, the Coordinator of the Office of Sustainability, and the City Arborist to update the City Council on the City’s progress toward creating a municipal composting program, to provide a fiscal impact statement on creating the program, and to estimate a time line for Citywide implementation of municipal compo

April 8, 2019

People all across Maryland - especially in Baltimore, Frederick, and Montgomery County where communities have fought or are fighting against trash incinerators in their neighborhoods - have been working to make sure that any increase in the renewable portfolio standard not increase subsidies for trash incineration. Today, on the last day of the legislative session, the current version of the Clean Energy Jobs Act maintains burning trash as a tier 1 renewable energy source, keeping it eligible for the maximum amount of subsidy available.