Protecting the Chesapeake

Marylanders love their crabs, fish, and the Bay, but this way of life could disappear forever unless we follow through on our pollution reduction commitments. Clean Water is working to reduce agricultural pollution, address polluted runoff, and keep Maryland on track.

General MD Baltimore Harbor. Credit HES Photography. Shutterstock

Local Victories From Around the State!

We’ve had a busy summer 2016 in Maryland! So much great work is being done to protect Maryland’s environment. Continue reading below to find out about some of our local victories from across the State.

Power plant behind water spewing smoke. Photo credit: Martin Haas / Shutterstock

Power Plant Pollution Poisoning the Chesapeake Bay

Coal-burning power plants are poisoning the Chesapeake Bay with millions of harmful pollutants every year, including excessive nutrients that contribute to “dead zones” where crabs, oysters, fish and other aquatic life cannot survive.

 

From We All Live Downstream

A dye test is used to track the water coming off a septic system. Important information can be determined by a dye test - like how quickly wastewater is flowing through a system or which system is flowing here.
March 14, 2019

Septic systems are a decentralized way to treat human waste. In most cases, an individual home has its own septic system and drain field.

February 25, 2019

In 2017, after years of work in coalition and thousands of grassroots comments from Marylanders like you, Maryland became the second state in the nation to pass a law limiting the use of antibiotics being fed to healthy animals.

February 22, 2019

For the past two years, Frederick and Carroll Counties have been debating the Monocacy Plan: an advisory document meant to guide both counties on improving the health of their shared Monocacy River. But between 2017 and 2018, drastic changes were made to the Plan that gutted its value for protecting and improving the Monocacy's water quality and environmental health. We're urging the Frederick County Council to reject the 2018 Monocacy Plan - a position the Frederick County Planning Commission just unanimously agreed upon, as well.