Protecting the Chesapeake

Marylanders love their crabs, fish, and the Bay, but this way of life could disappear forever unless we follow through on our pollution reduction commitments. Clean Water is working to reduce agricultural pollution, address polluted runoff, and keep Maryland on track.

Help shape the Sustainable Monocacy Commission

Right now, the Frederick County Council is considering Bill 19-17 (

Power plant behind water spewing smoke. Photo credit: Martin Haas / Shutterstock

Power Plant Pollution Poisoning the Chesapeake Bay

Coal-burning power plants are poisoning the Chesapeake Bay with millions of harmful pollutants every year, including excessive nutrients that contribute to “dead zones” where crabs, oysters, fish and other aquatic life cannot survive.

 

Environmental advocates from Frederick County and across Maryland call for action to Protect Frederick’s Forests

THURMONT — On Saturday, October 26, Stream-Link Education organized over one hundred volunteers to plant a new 6-acre forest on formerly open land

A stream flows green through a wooded area, indicating a leak during a dye test.

Safer Septic Systems for Maryland

Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay Cleanup requires nutrient reductions from every sector that contributes to water pollution.

From We All Live Downstream

MD_toxics_chlorpyrifos.jpg
January 7, 2020

This year, we will be advocating for:

The drain field component of a residential septic system is being put in place. Creative Commons license.
January 6, 2020

If your home is in a rural area in Maryland, your sinks, toilets, showers, dishwasher, and washing machine probably empty into a septic tank. How does a septic tank work? Watery waste, or effluent, is most of the waste, where anaerobic bacteria begin to break it down. The sludge, or inorganic solids which are the leftovers of bacteria digesting organic effluent, falls to the bottom of the tank.

Photo of protest signs at public hearing. Courtesy of Patch.com
December 11, 2019

In Abingdon in Harford County, a developer has proposed to build a new "Abingdon Business Park:" three e-commerce/warehouse facilities, four restaurants, two flex retail spaces, one hotel, one convenience store and additional flex spaces, requiring the clear-cutting of 226 acres of a 330-acre forest. While sometimes development on forested lands is necessary, the developer has not proven that the negative externalities to the public are outweighed by the benefits, or that they considered putting their project on sites that would have less of an impact on water quality.