Protecting the Chesapeake

Marylanders love their crabs, fish, and the Bay, but this way of life could disappear forever unless we follow through on our pollution reduction commitments. Clean Water is working to reduce agricultural pollution, address polluted runoff, and keep Maryland on track.

Street drain, stormwater runoff. Photo credit: Abramov Timur / Shutterstock

Stormwater Pollution

Stormwater is the polluted runoff gathered from rain, severe thunderstorms, and even snow from roads, parking lots, and other impervious surfaces, where runoff collects pollutants and carries them downstream, ultimately into the Chesapeake Bay.

Our Maryland Priorities

Clean Water Action is a national grassroots organization with 53,000 members in Maryland. We work for clean, safe, and affordable water, whether in the streams, rivers or Chesapeake Bay, or from the tap through grassroots organizing, policy work, and campaigns. Check out our current priority campaigns:

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From We All Live Downstream

February 21, 2020

This week, Governor Hogan announced his surprising new intent to phase out the toxic pesticide chlorpyrifos not by passing a new law, but by starting a new regulatory process. Unfortunately, time and time again, we have seen the Maryland Department of Agriculture undermine environmental policy through a regulatory process that has minimal public input and accountability. Click here to tell your representatives: we must ban chlorpyrifos through legislation, not regulation.

Septic tank lid. photo: flickr.com/mmwm (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
February 13, 2020

Did you know that septic systems inspectors in Maryland don't have to be licensed? That's right - the person who paints your home has to go through more training, paperwork, and ongoing requirements than the person who checks that your poop will be processed properly. We're working on a bill to change that system; check out our testimony this week on SB254 below.

 

February 12, 2020

Yesterday, we testified in favor of House Bill 279, which would reduce the barriers that prevent people who want to reduce polluted stormwater runoff from installing green infrastructure on their own property. As we work to improve our local waterways, local governments should be making that easier, not harder! Here's what we had to say:

 

HB 279: Real Property - Restrictions on Use - Low-Impact Landscaping

House Environment and Transportation Committee

February 11, 2020