Protecting the Chesapeake

Marylanders love their crabs, fish, and the Bay, but this way of life could disappear forever unless we follow through on our pollution reduction commitments. Clean Water is working to reduce agricultural pollution, address polluted runoff, and keep Maryland on track.

Our Maryland Priorities

Clean Water Action is a national grassroots organization with 53,000 members in Maryland. We work for clean, safe, and affordable water, whether in the streams, rivers or Chesapeake Bay, or from the tap through grassroots organizing, policy work, and campaigns. Check out our current priority campaigns:

A stream flows green through a wooded area, indicating a leak during a dye test.

Safer Septic Systems for Maryland

Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay Cleanup requires nutrient reductions from every sector that contributes to water pollution, including septic systems.

Photo credit: Dalis Davidson of Dancing Leaf Farm

Montgomery County Council Votes to Advance Solar in the Agricultural Reserve With Care

On Thursday January 26th the Council discussed and voted on amendments to ZTA 20-01 –a provision to allow siting up to three square mile

Power plant behind water spewing smoke. Photo credit: Martin Haas / Shutterstock

Power Plant Pollution Poisoning the Chesapeake Bay

Coal-burning power plants are poisoning the Chesapeake Bay with millions of harmful pollutants every year, including excessive nutrients that contribute to “dead zones” where crabs, oysters, fish and other aquatic life cannot survive.

 

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From We All Live Downstream

A carved pumpkin sits in fall leaves.
October 27, 2021

By: Tiffany Bui, Maryland Intern

As Halloween creeps closer, jack-o-lanterns haunt windows and gourds replace the usual dinner table centerpiece. You have probably already noticed that pumpkins are an autumn aesthetic staple. However, their menacing carved faces are not the scariest things about them. Even though pumpkins die out of style at the end of the season, they scan still haunt the environment and public health from beyond the grave.

Environmental Impact

September 29, 2021

We usually associate saltwater with the ocean, which gets its distinctive flavor from naturally occurring minerals. Such minerals are also found in freshwater systems in lower concentrations, and natural salt levels vary with local geology. However, human inputs of salt increase concentrations far beyond naturally occurring levels, threatening ecosystem balance. Therefore, it is important to understand how humans cause salt pollution. In this section, we will reveal the human activities responsible for salt pollution and the extent of their impacts.

List of chloride impaired waters
September 29, 2021

In Maryland, salt pollution is already problematic and continues to worsen. Currently, 28 of Maryland’s streams are identified as chloride impaired [Winter Salt]. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets the baseline secondary contaminant level for chloride, a common component of road salt (mostly sodium chloride, NaCl), at 250 mg/L; however, many of the state’s streams have exceeded this limit for over 20 years [UMD extension].