Protecting & Conserving California's Water

Shasta Dam in California

Investing for California’s Future - Groundwater, Not Dams

Read why groundwater storage makes more sense for California than new dams.

 

Collaborating For Success: Stakeholder Engagement for Sustainable Groudwater Management Act Implementation

Collaborating for Success: Stakeholder Engagement for Sustainable Groundwater Management Act Implementation

Read the full report.

Executive Summary: In August 2014, the California Legislature passed the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA), marking a fundamental shift in the management of water resources in California.

Senators Portantino and Gonzalez Introduce Clean Water Legislation to Monitor PFAS Chemical Contamination

“Understanding the full extent of PFAS contamination in California's drinking water is critical to both protect the public and enable us to make the most cost-effective decisions about water treatment,” said Andria Ventura, toxics program manager for Clean Water Action. “We don't want to have to keep rethinking technical investments because we didn't have a full understanding of the problem.  That's not fair to water systems or ratepayers.”

From We All Live Downstream

Dripping spiggot
March 27, 2020

With all that’s happening right now, it can be difficult to pay attention to  anything other than the news of the day. I’m focused on groundwater; how we use it – and use too much; how we protect it from pollution – or don’t; and how we can ensure that it’s available when we need it. And even on a day when we’re not focused on a pandemic, groundwater can be easy to forgot about -- it's our invisible resource.

October 10, 2017

Those of you reading the New York Times will have seen the recent story on spiking Fentanyl deaths across America.

America’s opioid epidemic is drawing public attention to a less-considered side effect of mushrooming dependence on prescription medications: water pollution by pharmaceuticals. And that’s where we at Clean Water Action come in.

July 19, 2017

Yesterday, the State Water Resources Control Board voted to create a new legal limit on 1,2,3-Trichloroproane (TCP), a man-made, carcinogenic drinking water contaminant found across California. This is the culmination of years of work from Clean Water Action members like you, holding Shell Oil and Dow Chemical accountable for their failure to put public health above their profits, when they first learned of the dangers of TCP.

Now comes the hard work as water agencies work to comply with the new rule.