A Safe and Healthy Connecticut

Clean Water campaigns statewide and locally to reduce and eliminate toxic chemical exposures in our everyday lives - in buildings, schools, and workplaces, air, water and food, and in consumer products.

Keep Playgrounds Free of Toxic Recycled Tire Mulch

We can't throw tires away in landfills because of all the toxic chemicals they contain so why is it okay to grind them up, call it recycled rubber mulch and use them on children's playgrounds?  Recycled tire rubber contains numerous toxic chemicals including styrene, a chemical that is neurotoxic and a likely human carcinogen, butadiene-a proven human carcinogen linked to leukemia and lymphoma and lead and cadmium which are also neurotoxic.  

Couch on fire. Photo credit: Timothy Epp / Shutterstock

Safer Sofas

Toxic flame retardant chemicals are no longer needed in home products made with polyurethane foam—but a new report shows that while many companies are making sure their products are free of toxic flame retardants, others are lagging behind.

The team at the Chemicals of Concern Event in CT in June 2017

Huge Progress on Chemicals of Concern in Connecticut

June 14th, 2017 was a milestone for Connecticut as members of Clean Water Action and the Coalition for a Safe and Healthy CT joined with

From We All Live Downstream

Farmington River. Credit Jon-Lewis, Flickr--Creative Commons
August 20, 2019

It’s unfortunate that it took a tragic spill of nearly 40,000 gallons of firefighting foam into the Farmington River for PFAS contamination to finally get some attention in Connecticut. And we’re finally getting some action -- U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal is leading efforts in Washington to assure that firefighting foam containing PFAS chemicals is no longer required by the Department of Defense (DOD). We thank the Senator for his efforts and are proud to join with him to urge strong federal action. 

Hartford skyline and Connecticut River. Photo credit: Sean Pavone / iStock
February 25, 2019

CT Member Survey Results

CT Capitol building flickr.com/craigfildes cc
January 15, 2019

At the 2018 annual Safer States meeting, state leads, scientists, lawyers and advocates from across the U.S, discussed the stark reality of the health and environmental impacts of per and polyfluorinated chemicals, commonly referred to as PFAS.