A Safe and Healthy Connecticut

Clean Water campaigns statewide and locally to reduce and eliminate toxic chemical exposures in our everyday lives - in buildings, schools, and workplaces, air, water and food, and in consumer products.

Keep Playgrounds Free of Toxic Recycled Tire Mulch

We can't throw tires away in landfills because of all the toxic chemicals they contain so why is it okay to grind them up, call it recycled rubber mulch and use them on children's playgrounds?  Recycled tire rubber contains numerous toxic chemicals including styrene, a chemical that is neurotoxic and a likely human carcinogen, butadiene-a proven human carcinogen linked to leukemia and lymphoma and lead and cadmium which are also neurotoxic.  

Couch on fire. Photo credit: Timothy Epp / Shutterstock

Safer Sofas

Toxic flame retardant chemicals are no longer needed in home products made with polyurethane foam—but a new report shows that while many companies are making sure their products are free of toxic flame retardants, others are lagging behind.

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From We All Live Downstream

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January 21, 2020

Our work with Connecticut’s procurement agency is paying off. Connecticut will now restrict the purchasing of many food service ware and food packaging items that contain toxic per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS chemicals) and significantly reduce styrene (Styrofoam) and plastics. 

PFAS Rhode Island
November 14, 2019

We’re celebrating some big wins with our Mind the Store campaign work this fall! This campaign focuses on targeting major retailers and urging them to work with their suppliers to shift away from toxic chemicals in products, including the “forever chemicals” known as PFAS or per and polyfluoroalkyl substances. Recent highlights include: 

September 17, 2019: Home Depot announces it will no longer sell carpets or textiles containing PFAS chemicals.

Farmington River. Credit Jon-Lewis, Flickr--Creative Commons
August 20, 2019

It’s unfortunate that it took a tragic spill of nearly 40,000 gallons of firefighting foam into the Farmington River for PFAS contamination to finally get some attention in Connecticut. And we’re finally getting some action -- U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal is leading efforts in Washington to assure that firefighting foam containing PFAS chemicals is no longer required by the Department of Defense (DOD). We thank the Senator for his efforts and are proud to join with him to urge strong federal action.