flooding

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Green Infrastructure- the Solution to Pittsburgh's Sewage Overflow & Increasing Rain Events

November 11, 2019

We are already seeing the impacts of a changing climate through heavy rain.

Street drain, stormwater runoff. Photo credit: Abramov Timur / Shutterstock

Approval of flawed stormwater plans disappointing

October 21, 2016

This past Monday, Governor Hogan’s Administration circulated a press release praising local governments for having "met their requirements under state law to develop financing plans to reduce polluted stormwater runoff and protect and restore local waters and the Chesapeake Bay."  But most of these plans don't actually meet the requirements of the law.

Bioswales like this help control storm water bring the beauty of nature to Providence College’s urban campus. Photo By Dave Everett

Lessons from a Rainy Day

August 9, 2016

I had a relative who told me when I was growing up: “If you want to make sure it rains, plan an event that must be held outside.”

I’m pleased to say that wisdom proved correct when our tour of green infrastructure projects at Providence College was held in a light, steady rainfall.

The fact that Mother Nature sent us a little precipitation served to better illustrate how the network of campus bioswales helps direct and infiltrate storm water runoff.

Green infrastructure projects like this rain garden in East Baltimore hold rainwater in place until it can soak into the ground and reduce the total volume of water entering the storm drain system. Photo by Jennifer Kunze.

Reducing Stormwater Runoff in the Chesapeake Bay

August 8, 2016

Stormwater runoff is one of the leading contributors to pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. After big storms, the water carries whatever is on the ground and in the streets into our waterways. Impervious surfaces, such as the roads and pavement that cover densely populated areas, don’t allow rain to seep into the ground, causing more polluted stormwater to enter the Bay.

Debris in Maryland Photo by Jennifer Kunze

Flash flood shows need for better stormwater restoration plans

August 3, 2016

On Saturday, July 30th, a flash flood devastated Ellicott City. Approximately six inches of rain fell in two hours, which carried away over 100 vehicles and caused millions of dollars of damage to the City’s roads, sidewalks, and buildings. Not only was there severe destruction of infrastructure, but the storm also killed two people who were swept away by the water.

Christie Administration Floods the Garden State

June 2, 2016

Right now, over 90 percent of New Jersey's waters do not meet one or more water quality standards. These standards are set by New Jersey under the law and the state is obligated to meet them.

So, one would think that our state government would be doing all they can to improve the quality of our water by ensuring the standards are enforced. Nope. They are, in fact, doing the complete opposite.