Equitable Development

Where and how we grow has an enormous impact on our air, water, and finances. Clean Water is committed to inclusive processes that protect communities and the environment so that our families, neighborhoods, and local economies thrive. Every community deserves to have their health and environmental safety treated with equity and integrity. We need development in the right places, an equitable transportation system, affordable housing, and community input in order to grow better together.

Street drain, stormwater runoff. Photo credit: Abramov Timur / Shutterstock

Stormwater Pollution

Stormwater is the polluted runoff gathered from rain, severe thunderstorms, and even snow from roads, parking lots, and other impervious surfaces, where runoff collects pollutants and carries them downstream, ultimately into the Chesapeake Bay.

From We All Live Downstream

September 4, 2019

This week, the Baltimore County Council voted to pass Bill 37-19, which closes two loopholes that impacted open space requirements in the county. Previously, developers could count parking lot islands and private amenities towards their required open space acreage. Common sense dictates that little patches of grass surrounded by parking lot and private amenities, like rooftop pools, are not public recreational space. 

August 23, 2019

Howard County has a lot of upcoming legislation with hearings scheduled in September. This includes CB38-2019, the Protect This Watershed bill.

Councilwoman Liz Walsh's CB38-2019 is a very big bill that is responding to the problem of waivers in the Patapsco Lower North Branch Watershed. Many laws involving the environment include waivers at the discretion of the overseeing agency, mainly to provide needed flexibility in unforeseen circumstances. When waivers become routine practice, they undermine the effectiveness of that legislation. 

forest along water
August 14, 2019

On Tuesday, August 20th, County Executive Pittman is holding a town hall at South River High School (201 Central Ave E, Edgewater, MD 21037) at 6:30 PM to present his proposed update to Anne Arundel County's Forest Conservation laws. 

Forests throughout Maryland are disappearing, replaced by development. When trends are analyzed, it becomes apparent that Maryland's state minimum forest conservation practices are not doing a good job at protecting our contiguous and heavily forested parcels. It is in these heavily forested parcels that the state is losing hundreds of acres a year.