Our Priorities

Since our founding during the campaign to pass the landmark Clean Water Act in 1972, Clean Water Action has worked to win strong health and environmental protections by bringing issue expertise, solution-oriented thinking and people power to the table. 

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Stream, image from the surface of the water. Photo credit: Olesya Mishkina / Shutterstock

Clean water is the foundation for healthy & prosperous communities. While our nation has made significant progress since the 1970’s in cleaning up many of our rivers, bays and other vital water resources, we still face significant water quality and quantity challenges. Drinking water sources are threatened by pollution and overconsumption, and some of these threats are made worse by climate change.

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Pumpjacks with a methane flare in the background. Photo credit: Leonid Ikan / Shutterstock

Clean Water is working to protect people and communities from oil and gas production's harmful environmental and health impacts while pushing for the transition to a clean energy economy.

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Sunset, powerplant, cyclist. Photo credit: Kalmatsuy / Shutterstock

Climate change is impacting us. And it’s not good. Pollution from power plants and other sources is affecting our food, our air, and our water. It’s super-sizing things like hurricanes and droughts. If we don’t take action, it’s only going to get worse. 

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Rally at Reflecting Pool in DC. Credit: Diane Diederich / iStockphoto

Clean Water Action harnesses grassroots power by engaging and mobilizing our members and endorsing clean water leaders in elections from the local to national level.

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Child playing with toy. Photo credit: Studio-Annika / Shutterstock

From before we are born until the time we die, we are repeatedly and regularly exposed to toxic chemicals with the potential to seriously harm our health. Toxic chemicals can be found in our homes, schools and workplaces – in products we use on a daily basis. We're fighting at local, state, and federal levels to fix our chemical laws and find safer alternatives to the chemicals in everyday products.

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Pile of plastic waste. Photo credit: Mikadun / Shutterstock

Clean Water is  taking-on single use products. From shopping bags, to food and beverage packaging, to plastic water bottles, our goal is to minimize the use of single use products.  We engage businesses, local governments, and individual consumers in rethinking the disposable lifestyle.

From We All Live Downstream

South Platte River -- Photo credit: Jennifer Peters
Water
August 1, 2019

Visit South Platte River Park in Littleton, Colorado (a suburb a few miles south of Denver) on a summer weekend and you’ll likely see dozens of people paddling, wading, fishing, or tubing on the river. A few weeks ago I was one of those tubers enjoying higher than normal flows on the South Platte, thanks to the high snowpack this past winter. As we floated on riffles and gentle rapids, families of ducks grazed at the river’s edge and trout swam beneath us. Occasionally we got caught on someone’s fishing line or bumped tubes in crowded sections of the river.

Attacking the Clean Water Act is not a game
Water
June 5, 2019

The Trump/Wheeler Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is dismantling critical parts of the Clean Water Act one by one. Cumulatively these are the most serious threat to our nation’s bedrock environmental law in its history. If even one of these administration proposals is finalized, the consequences would be dire. Taken together, the Clean Water Act as we know it could go away. Since the Trump administration is parceling out these assaults, it can be hard to see the full picture.

srl pipeline construction
Water
August 9, 2019

Today the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) unveiled its latest attack on the Clean Water Act and protections for our water and communities. Don’t worry if you’ve lost count -- this is the third or fourth this year -- and more are coming

What did EPA propose?