A Safe and Healthy Rhode Island

Clean Water is working to reduce and eliminate toxic chemical exposures in our everyday lives- in buildings, schools, and workplaces, air, water and food, and in consumer products.

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Demand a Plastic Free Providence!

Clean Water Action is working to ensure a plastic free Providence, starting with phasing out single-use disposable plastic bags.

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Tell legislators to keep toxic chemicals like PFAS out of our food packaging!

PFAS or per and poly-fluoroalkyl substances can be toxic to humans and yet they are found in our food packaging (pizza boxes, bakery paper, microwa

Fire Fighter in front of a burning building. Credit: Mike Gabelmann / Creative Commons - Flickr

Protect Families, Firefighters From Toxic Flame Retardants

Toxic chemical flame retardants are added to a variety of common household products like upholstered furniture, bedding, car seats and high-chair pads. These chemicals have been linked to health hazards like cancer, neurological deficits, impaired fertility and learning disabilities.

Microplastics_Rhode Island. Photo Credit Oregon State University

Rhode Island Trash Trawl - Solving the Problem of Microplastics

In summer 2017, we conducted a “trash trawl” in the bay to look for microplastics lurking in our own backyard in Narragansett Bay from July 18-22. The goal was to figure out how much microplastic pollution there is in the bay, where the most plastic can be found, and ultimately, what we can do to stop it from entering our waters to begin with.

From We All Live Downstream

Plastic Pollution-ReThinkDisposable-Photo by Volodymyr Hryshchenko on Unsplash
January 11, 2022

In this three part blog series, learn more about our work in Rhode Island to fight climate change, stop plastic pollution, and create healthier communities. The first in our series focuses on our campaign to stop plastic pollution.

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October 29, 2021

Clean Water Action is also pushing for one or two things: a reduced tax rate for non-single-use products made from virgin resins or clear definitions explaining what products are single-use and which are not. Join Clean Water Action in eliminating the problem at the source. 

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October 25, 2021

In recent years, bills have been introduced to address polystyrene, plastic flatware, single-use water bottles and other plastic packaging. But, none have succeeded. The most efficient way to comprehensively solve the problem of single-use plastics, then, is with a statewide EPR bill.