National Blog Posts

NEPA Silenced

We Will Not Be Silenced: Speaking Out Against NEPA Rollbacks

February 25, 2020

Today, Clean Water Action joined environmental advocates and community leaders from across the country for a rally and hearing in Washington, DC to speak out against the Trump Administration's rollbacks of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Check out the testimony of Kim Gaddy, Clean Water Action's Environmental Justice Organizer, who traveled from Newark, NJ to speak at the hearing.

EPA office building

Budget cuts will get in the way of getting the lead out

February 13, 2020

As I watched a February 11 hearing about regulating lead at the tap, I experienced one of those “Opposite Day” episodes where two objective realities collide.

Trump's head

Trump’s FY 21 Budget: The worst budget for water. By the worst president ever

February 11, 2020

These cuts won’t just mean that EPA is doing less to protect our water, they also hit state and local governments and drinking water systems hard. States where Clean Water Action works would lose out on federal funding, leaving taxpayers and ratepayers holding the bag. 

Oil and water. Credit Andrew Grinberg

The Water Impacts of CO2-EOR

January 30, 2020

To stave off the worst effects of the climate crisis, the global and U.S. economies need to decarbonize as fast as possible.

Trump's Dirty Water Rule

Trump’s Dirty Water Rule: Another Gift to Oil and Gas

January 23, 2020

The Trump administration finalized its signature Clean Water Act rollback, the

Three glasses of water on a table. Photo credit:  bunyarit / Shutterstock

Key Issues in EPA’s Proposed Lead and Copper Rule Revisions #3 -- Faster Replacement

January 22, 2020

Under current regulations, if water systems exceed the Action Level for lead, they must take a number of actions including commencing lead service line replacement at a rate of 7% annually.  EPA’s proposed LCR revisions reduce this rate to 3% while closing some loopholes and proposing other requirements that will support more efficient and effective replacement programs. While closing loopholes and putting in place other requirements to make replacement activities more effective are positive steps, EPA is  justified in lowering the required rate of replacement. When systems exceed the lead Action Level, 7% is a realistic yet ambitious rate of replacement.