Act on Climate in Maryland

Cleaning our water and air means both reducing dirty energy and promoting clean energy. Clean Water helped pass the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act and the fracking moratorium, and works with a diverse coalition of organizations to persuade legislators that fracking is inherently dangerous to water resources and community health.

A rally for offshore wind in May 2017 in front of Baltimore's City Hall.

Bring offshore wind and onshore jobs to Maryland!

Tell the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management to approve Maryland's offshore wind farms without unnecessary and harmful restrictions that could make t

Pipelines reflecting sunset. Photo credit Amy Johansson / Shutterstock

The Impacts of Pipelines

The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) issued a permit to Columbia Gas without providing the necessary information to the public, and did not comply with Clean Water Act or State Law when issuing the permit.

 

Oil train with DOT-111 train cars. Photo credit: Todd Klassy / Shutterstock

Fracking & Oil and Gas in Maryland

Clean Water and Don’t Frack MD, a 100 group coalition, pursued a statewide campaign and won passage for the Protect Our Health and Communities Act (HB449/ SB409).

From We All Live Downstream

Maryland forest in late summer
August 28, 2019

Today, the Maryland Department of the Environment announced that they are denying the permits to clear cut over 200 acres of Southern Maryland forest for a solar project.

August 23, 2019

Howard County has a lot of upcoming legislation with hearings scheduled in September. This includes CB38-2019, the Protect This Watershed bill.

Councilwoman Liz Walsh's CB38-2019 is a very big bill that is responding to the problem of waivers in the Patapsco Lower North Branch Watershed. Many laws involving the environment include waivers at the discretion of the overseeing agency, mainly to provide needed flexibility in unforeseen circumstances. When waivers become routine practice, they undermine the effectiveness of that legislation. 

January 18, 2019

Burning trash is not clean energy. When incinerators burn trash, they emit more greenhouse gasses per unit of energy generated than even coal, the dirtiest of fossil fuels. Unfortunately, Maryland currently subsidizes trash incinerators in our state’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) - giving taxpayer money to the incinerators as if they are clean sources of energy like solar or wind.